Celebrations International Travel Blog

Posts Tagged ‘Chinese food

I came across this interesting article and thought I’d share it.  I’ll be the first to admit that unless I’m on the go and pressed for time, I prefer to seek out better food options when I’m traveling. 

To this list I’d like to add a personal favorite:  Changi International Airport in Singapore.  Their food court boasts numerous options including local specialties, all at reasonable prices for an airport.  The noodle house offers fresh Chinese hand-pulled noodles of all different varieties….a very welcome choice for a “fried-and-dipped”-weary world traveler!

Eat Up:  10 Airport Dining Experiences That Make Flying Taste Better

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Check out this mouthwatering post on GotSaga.com that I was graciously invited to contribute to:  http://t.co/KcHBDfB Scroll down a bit until you see our picture!

Here’s the full text of my submission.  Enjoy!

China:  Peking Duck – A traditional three-course meal in which the duck is enjoyed in three different ways:  the crispy skin, the meat, and a soup course.

Thailand:  Phad Thai – This favorite is made up of flat, skinny rice noodles, bean sprouts, scallions, and other vegetables, tossed in a flavorful spicy and tangy sauce, topped with chopped peanuts.  The meat of your choice is most often added to this dish.

Vietnam:  Pho is a traditional Vietnamese noodle soup that is made in countless variations.  Vietnamese-style rice noodles are added to a spicy broth, along with beef, chicken, pork, or seafood and a variety of vegetables.  Diners are offered fresh lime, basil leaves, and bean sprouts to garnish to taste.

Australia:  Billy Tea & Damper:  A traditional Australian brewed tea with milk and sugar, enjoyed with a rustic-style biscuit.  The best thing about this is that it can be prepared virtually anywhere, including the middle of the Outback!

France:  Duck a l’Orange or Pate de Fois Gras – Duck with Orange Sauce or a terrine of Duck Liver Pate

Austria:  Weinerschnitzel – The traditional, richly-prepared Austrian veal cutlets

Switzerland:  Fondue or Raclette – The fondue is most often a mixture of different varieties of Swiss cheeses mixed with white wine or kirsch and fresh herbs, eaten with bite-sized pieces of a crusty baguette.  A raclette is a meal so unique I have never seen it elsewhere, even in Europe.  It requires a special grill with multiple compartments and surfaces, places in the middle of the table.  Diners choose from a variety of fresh vegetables, meats, eggs, or anything else the host fancies, puts the food in the raclette, and tops it off with cheeses, onion, garlic, herbs, and other condiments.  The heat from the raclette melds the ingredients together, resulting in a tasty and unique creation.

Spain:  Paella – This is a rice dish traditionally made with a variety of fresh seafood (clams, mussels, oysters, shrimp, scallops, etc.) and meats like chorizo and chicken.  Flavored with a rich broth and plenty of bright yellow saffron, paella can be prepared over an open fire and enjoyed on the beach, or savored in a five-star establishment.

Morocco:  Traditional Couscous –  This traditional meal is presented in huge, deep bowls.  First, a generous portion of couscous fills the bottom of the bowl, and is typically topped with cubed or sliced lamb, beef, and chicken or another meat of choice.  Fresh, colorful vegetables are added (root vegetables, etc.), then a slightly spicy, flavorful broth is ladled over everything….a great king-sized meal!

Almost all Chinese people I know (myself included) love to celebrate the holidays (make that any holiday) with an abundance of good food.  Considering my own background, I think the Chinese have some of the most discerning palates and tastes in the world.  By “discerning,” I don’t mean that all food has to be 5-star restaurant-looking, but it has to be good.  Good by the Chinese cook’s own discerning standards, that is!

While some foods are symbolic during various festivals and occasions, many dishes can be served and enjoyed throughout the year.  Here are a few traditional dishes:

Ming Tsai’s Red-Roast Duck with Baby Bok Choy

Braised Chinese Mushrooms

Sticky Rice with Chinese Sausage

Try your hand at making these and other Chinese specialties on a culinary tour to China!  The sample itinerary is posted on our Web site to give you an idea of the types of things you can see and do on one of our culinary tours.  However, we encourage you to take that inspiration (and your love of Chinese cooking) and run with it!  We will customize your culinary tour to suit your interests, preferences, dates, and budget.  Don’t just eat your way through China, this is your chance to truly experience the cuisine and culture!

Celebrations International Travel…Celebrating Life Through Travel SM

This tweet just caught my attention:

@FoodieDownUnder “Tomato&oregano make it Italian,wine&tarragon make it French.Sour cream makes it Russian.Soy sauce makes it Chinese;garlic makes it good.”

These words got me thinking:   So true it is that certain foods and culinary traditions are automatically associated with certain countries and cultures.  On the other hand, is it fair to say that sometimes these associations can be somewhat stereotypical, or simply the result of pop culture’s influence?

Example:  Many people commonly associate soy sauce with Chinese food because it’s what we get with Chinese take-out.  But how many of us would automatically think of Japanese food when it comes to soy sauce?  I think we sushi lovers would be in a fine mess without it!

For the record, yes, I agree, garlic makes it good!  Almost dinnertime at my house!

Dim Sum with Adrienne

I’m known to my friends and family as culinary enthusiast.  I see food as an essential cultural element, alongside art, literature, music, holidays, and customs.  With so many families adopting from China, I thought it would be a good idea to tell you about dim sum, a meal traditionally enjoyed at breakfast or lunch.  Although you are likely to see dim sum throughout your trip, this custom orginated in Canton Province (now Guangdong Province).  In Chinese it is called “yum cha” which, literally translated, means “to drink tea.”  The term “dim sum” actually refers to the foods served at the meal.

Seated at a large round table with a lazy susan, you will be offered Chinese tea, which they may have in different varieties.  “Pooh Ehr” is a version of Chinese black tea, and chrysanthemum tea sweetened with rock sugar is also common.  Some restaurants offer a mix of the two.  Once the tea is served, a waiter will place a ticket on your table, then it’s time to eat!

Dim sum is served in small quantities so that it’s possible to try lots of different things.  Waiters and waitresses push carts of food through the dining room, stopping at each table to offer you something.  You will notice food served on small plates, bowls, bamboo steamer baskets, and dishes covered with domed stainless steel lids.  If the food is not clearly visible from the cart, the server will lift the lids to show you each type of dim sum on the cart.  If you see something you’d like to try, let them know, and they’ll put the dish on your lazy susan and mark your ticket for the number and type of dishes that have been served to your table.  A lazy susan is always used in Chinese restaurant-style and formal dining to make it easier for foods to be shared and reached with chopsticks.

Here’s a sampling of soe typical dim sum dishes that you might enjoy:

Meat & Shrimp Roe Dumpling

Meat & Shrimp Roe Dumpling

Roast Pork Buns

Roast Pork Buns

Marinated Meatballs

Marinated Meatballs

Sauteed Spareribs

Sauteed Spareribs

Shrimp Dumplings

Shrimp Dumplings

Shumai

Shumai


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This is blog based on the experiences and interests of travel agency owners Adrienne and Agni Mitra. Through our blog entries, we will share our travel experience and expertise. We will also have other entries of interest to inspire your travels.

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